Friday, January 9, 2015

AASWOMEN Newsletter for January 09, 2015

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women

Issue of January 09, 2015
eds: Daryl Haggard, Nicolle Zellner, Meredith Hughes, & Elysse Voyer

This week's issues:

1. CSWA: Survey on Workplace Climate

2. Confessions of a Female Faculty Candidate

3. Men (on the Internet) don't believe sexism is a problem in science, even when they see evidence

4. A look back at the inspiring achievements by women scientists in 2014

5. Mildred Dresselhaus Guest Professorship Programme

6. Emmy Noether Visiting Fellowships

7. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

8. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

9. Access to Past Issues


1. CSWA: Survey on Workplace Climate

From: Christina Richey via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

The AAS Committee on the Status of Women in Astronomy (CSWA) is conducting a survey on Workplace Climate. The CSWA wants to learn if members of the astronomical community encounter negative language, or experience verbal or physical altercations on the basis of gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, ability status, or race and ethnicity. The survey is designed to request information during the respondent's current position and previous position (if the respondent has changed positions within the last five years). This information is requested in order to understand if astronomers and planetary scientists encounter varying workplace climates at different stages of their career.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2015/01/cswa-survey-on-workplace-climate.html

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2. Confessions of a Female Faculty Candidate

From: Jessica Kirkpatrick via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

[Below is an anonymous guest post submitted by an astronomer on the faculty job market for the first time.]

I am a woman in her early 30's in astronomy, and this is my first time applying for faculty jobs. Here's what I knew beforehand. I knew statistically that I'd be likeliest to "leak" from the research pipeline at this exact juncture: reaching up to barely touch the lowest rung of junior professor. I knew that women falsely identify limitations as lying within when they truly lie without: that Impostor Syndrome is especially rampant among us. And I knew the process would be fraught with rejection. Despite educating myself, I have been grappling with profound feelings of inadequacy that are very gendered. There are statistics of women leaving science at this stage, but a lived experience isn't fully expressed with statistics: what does it feel like to be a woman grappling with this professional transition with all her might? My mental health provider had to remind me that there is a context for this struggle beyond my own scientific record and the scary academic job market. If I'm feeling this stuff, so are other women. It's so hard to hang in there. She said, "if you could talk about this to other women at your same stage, what would you say? What would you like to hear?" I'd want to hear how it feels to other women, to normalize my own experience. My experience as a white, middle-class, cisgendered woman is a privileged one, and is not universal: distinct emotional costs exist for people residing at other intersections. My experiences are reflective of my social status, and ought to be read that way.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2015/01/confessions-of-female-faculty-candidate.html

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3. Men (on the Internet) don't believe sexism is a problem in science, even when they see evidence

From: Elysse Voyer [elysse.voyer_at_gmail.com]

by Rachel Feltman

As a follow-up to recent studies on sexism and harassment in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math), researchers studied the Internet's reaction to the evidence those studies provided - and it turned out the way you'd expect, if you've ever been on the Internet.

Male commenters flipped out.

The new study's results were published Thursday in the journal Psychology of Women Quarterly.

To see how different genders reacted to evidence of bias in science (on the Internet, anyway), the researchers looked at the comment threads of three articles about studies on the issue, and quantified the responses.

Read more at

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2015/01/08/men-on-the-internet-dont-believe-sexism-is-a-problem-in-science-even-when-they-see-evidence

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4. A look back at the inspiring achievements by women scientists in 2014

From: Elysse Voyer [elysse.voyer_at_gmail.com]

by discov-her.com

We are all aware that women are underrepresented in many scientific fields, and that we see this division even more clearly at leadership positions and at the highest levels of science, where only 3% of women have won the Nobel Prize in Medicine, Physics or Chemistry (one of whom we honor in this article!). However, women are also making incredible strides in scientific fields and helping to further developments in many areas. Here are a few of the highlights from 2014 that we have picked out!

Read more at

http://discov-her.com/en/article/a-look-back-at-the-inspiring-achievements-by-women-scientists-in-2014

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5. Mildred Dresselhaus Guest Professorship Programme

From: WIPHYS Posting for Jan. 5, 2015

CUI has established a special visiting professorship programme, to which Mildred Dresselhaus in the Department of Physics at MIT kindly has given her name in support of a worthy cause:

-provide excellent research conditions for international outstanding women researchers: successful senior scientists as well as younger researchers with high potential;

-invite them to work within CUI for a period of two to six months;

-serve as role model for young women in the physical sciences;

-attract world leading researchers to Hamburg, start new and intensify existing collaborations;

-give a few lectures or focus courses on their topic of choice.

The Mildred Dresselhaus Award comprises a certificate and a personal prize money of 20,000 resp. 10,000 euro. To honour the awardees, it is presented within the festive frame of CUI's New Year's Reception. If you would like to recommend a woman scientist to receive this award, please send your conclusive recommendation until 16 February 2015 to cui.opportunity@cui.uni-hamburg.de; self-applications are welcome as well.

For further details please see

http://www.cui.uni-hamburg.de/en/equal-opportunity/mildred-dresselhaus-guest-professorship-programme

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6. Emmy Noether Visiting Fellowships

From: WIPHYS Posting for Jan. 5, 2015

Amalie Emmy Noether, an influential German mathematician known for her ground-breaking contributions to abstract algebra and theoretical physics, was regarded by Albert Einstein as the most important woman in the history of mathematics.

In honour of Noether's genius and legacy, Perimeter Institute invites applications for Emmy Noether Visiting Fellowships from outstanding theoretical physicists who wish to pursue research at the institute while on leave from their faculty positions at home institutes.

Perimeter Institute promotes an inclusive, welcoming culture and a family-friendly workplace. The Emmy Noether Fellowships are central to Perimeter Institute's initiatives to support female physicists.

For further details please see

http://www.perimeterinstitute.ca/emmy-noether-visiting-fellowships

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7. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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8. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

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9. Access to Past Issues

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to aaswlist+unsubscribe@aas.org.

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