Friday, February 27, 2015

AASWOMEN Newsletter for February 27, 2015

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women

Issue of February 27, 2015
eds: Daryl Haggard, Nicolle Zellner, Meredith Hughes, & Elysse Voyer

This week's issues:

1. CSWA's STATUS newsletter for January 2015 now available online

2. Future Directions in the Work-Family Equation

3. A recipe for culture change

4. Feminist writers are so besieged by online abuse that some have begun to retire

5. STEM survey for postgraduate women (participation deadline is TODAY)

6. First annual Emerging Researchers in Exoplanet Science Symposium (ERES) will be held May 28 & 29, 2015

7. 12 ways women unknowingly sabotage their success

8. Now Accepting Applications for the 2015 Blewett Fellowship

9. Job Opportunities

10. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

11. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

12. Access to Past Issues


1. CSWA's STATUS newsletter for January 2015 now available online

The January 2015 issue of CSWA's newsletter STATUS is now posted online. Thanks to all the authors and to the editorial group for a great job!

http://www.aas.org/cswa/status/Status2015_Jan_s.pdf

Articles:

Using Non-Cognitive Assessments in Graduate Admissions to Select Better Students and Increase Diversity - by Casey W. Miller

Senior Women Moving into Leadership Positions: Has ADVANCE Affected Junior and Senior Women Scientists Differently? - by Sue V. Rosser

Women of Color in Academia: A Conference - by Nancy D. Morrison

Book review and author interview: The Falling Sky by Pippa Goldschmidt - by Nicolle Zellner

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2. Future Directions in the Work-Family Equation

From: Neil Gehrels via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

An NPR blog by Maanvi Singh introduced me to an interesting article about gender equality in the workplace and home. It is by David Pedulla and Sarah Thebaud, faculty members at UT Austin and UC Santa Barbara, respectively. The article is titled "Can We Finish the Revolution? Gender, Work-Family Ideals, and Institutional Constraint" and published this year in the American Sociological Review.

The authors performed a survey to address the question of how much gender-specific workplace cultures and policies determine the roles that men and women play in their households. Even when couples have gender-equality ideals, workplace constraints may force them to adopt traditional roles of men as the earner and women as the caregiver. The motivation for the study is to understand why the gender revolution has "stalled". More women are in the workforce, but are still highly underrepresented tin top positions. Examples given are that women make up only 4% of Fortune 500 CEOs and 3% of members of Congress.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2015/02/future-directions-in-work-family.html

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3. A recipe for culture change

From: Ed Bertschinger via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

If you could design your ideal workplace, what would it look like? If you are reading this blog, chances are that your description includes more than a high salary and state of the art facilities and includes being valued for your ability and treated fairly and respectfully by others.

Recently I served on a visiting committee that privately interviewed every staff and faculty member of an academic department. If I had to design my ideal workplace, I could not have come up with a more satisfied group. Everyone loves their job and feels welcomed and respected. Inclusion, diversity, and excellence are seamlessly interwoven. My ideal workplace would look a lot like that.

During the past two years I was given the gift of time (about 18 months) to study my university in depth to make recommendations for advancing a respectful and caring community. The result is a report currently under discussion by faculty, staff, postdocs, students and alumni. Some of the recommendations, such as universal unconscious bias training, would, I believe, be quite impactful if they spread widely. That particular recommendation is based on groundbreaking work done at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Google.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2015/02/a-recipe-for-culture-change.html

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4. Feminist writers are so besieged by online abuse that some have begun to retire

From: Joan Schmelz [jschmelz_at_memphis.edu]

By Michelle Goldberg

Jessica Valenti is one of the most successful and visible feminists of her generation. As a columnist for the Guardian, her face regularly appears on the site's front page. She has written five books, one of which was adapted into a documentary, since founding the blog Feministing.com. She gives speeches all over the country. And she tells me that, because of the nonstop harassment that feminist writers face online, if she could start over, she might prefer to be completely anonymous. "I don't know that I would do it under my real name," she says she tells young women who are interested in writing about feminism. It's "not just the physical safety concerns but the emotional ramifications" of constant, round-the-clock abuse.

Read more at

http://tinyurl.com/peswpga

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5. STEM survey for postgraduate women (participation deadline is TODAY)

From: Kevin Flaherty [kflaherty_at_wesleyan.edu]

An ongoing survey of STEM postgraduate women on job satisfaction and institutional culture that may be of interest to the AASWOMEN readers. The deadline to participate is TODAY, Feb 27!

http://science-professor.blogspot.com/2015/02/stem-survey-for-postgraduate-women.html

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6. First annual Emerging Researchers in Exoplanet Science Symposium (ERES) will be held May 28 & 29, 2015

From: Lisa Kaltenegger [lkaltenegger_at_astro.cornell.edu]

The first annual Emerging Researchers in Exoplanet Science Symposium (ERES) will be held May 28 & 29, 2015 at the Pennsylvania State University in University Park, PA. This is the first in a series of annual symposia to be held in a rotating basis at different universities: Penn State (2015), Cornell (2016), and Yale (2017).

ERES is aimed at early career scientists (graduate students, postdocs, advanced undergraduates) working in all realms of exoplanetary science and related disciplines (e.g. brown dwarfs, protoplanetary disks, star formation, related instrumentation and theory). The conference will give emerging scientists an opportunity to present their work in either a short oral presentation or a poster session and to network with other early career scientists, and special career development experts.

Registration is now open! The registration deadline and deadline for abstract submission is March 26, 2015.

To register, submit an abstract, or find more information about travel and accommodations, please visit eres-symposium.org or email L-ERES-2015-QUESTIONS_at_lists.psu.edu.

You can find the conference poster to help advertise around your department at eres-symposium.org/ERESS_Poster.pdf

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7. 12 ways women unknowingly sabotage their success

From: Meg Urry [meg.urry_at_yale.edu]

This article contains some useful advice:

http://www.businessinsider.com/ways-women-sabotage-their-success-2015-2

It's important not to blame the woman but it is true that women are playing by existing (men's) rules in astronomy and other male-dominated sciences, so it's worth thinking about how our approaches mesh with those rules.

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8. Now Accepting Applications for the 2015 Blewett Fellowship

From WIPHYS posting for Feb 23, 2015

The Blewett Fellowship enables women to return to physics research careers after having had to interrupt those careers. Applications are due June 1, 2015.

Learn more and apply here

http://www.aps.org/programs/women/scholarships/blewett/index.cfm

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9. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here: http://www.aas.org/cswa/diversity.html#howtoincrease

-Physics, Assistant Professor/Instructor, Minnesota State University, Mankato
http://tinyurl.com/qxrq45u

-UCSD Open Position for Project Scientist
https://apol-recruit.ucsd.edu/apply/JPF00760

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10. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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11. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

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12. Access to Past Issues

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to aaswlist+unsubscribe@aas.org.

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